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CNHA Hovenweep National Monument
Hovenweep National Monument

Banner photo by Neal Herbert (National Park Service)

Hovenweep National Monument protects six prehistoric, Puebloan-era villages spread over a twenty-mile expanse of mesa tops and canyons along the Utah-Colorado border. Multi-storied towers perched on canyon rims and balanced on boulders lead visitors to marvel at the skill and motivation of their builders. Hovenweep is noted for its solitude and undeveloped, natural character.

Human habitation at Hovenweep dates to over 10,000 years ago when nomadic Paleo Indians visited the Cajon Mesa to gather food and hunt game. These people used the area for centuries, following the seasonal weather patterns. By about A.D. 900, people started to settle at Hovenweep year-round.

The Square Tower Group is the primary contact facility with a National Park Service and CNHA collaborated visitor center, campground and interpretive trail. Other groups (or villages) include Cajon, Cutthroat Castle, Goodman Point, Hackberry, Holly and Horseshoe.



More Information
Hovenweep National Monument Website
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