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Delicate Arch

Arches National Park - Like Nowhere Else on Earth

Corona Arch

Moab Utah - Surprises Around Every Corner

Natural Bridges

Experience our version of "Night Life"

 

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  • Posted By Barbara Webb

    MIC Lectures are FREE! Join us at the Moab Information Center, conveniently located on the corner of Main and Center St.

  • ZannoExcavation of New Fossil Vertebrates Localities in the Upper Jurassic and Upper Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation (BLM)

    Principal Investigator: Lindsay E. Zanno, Ph.D., Director, Paleontology & Geology Research Lab, NCMNS; Assistant Research Professor, Biological Sciences, NCSU.

    Dinosaurs of the mid-Cretaceous (late Early Cretaceous period through early Late Cretaceous period) are extremely rare worldwide. North America preserves one of the few opportunities to discover and document these poorly understood ecosystems. One of the most fossiliferous rock formations spanning the mid-Cretaceous in North America is the Cedar Mountain Formation (CMF), which spans the Aptian through Cenomanian (125 – 98 million years ago) and crops out between western Colorado and central Utah. The CMF has been subject to intensive work over the past two decades. This work has revealed the presence of multiple dinosaur faunas previously unknown to science and changed the way we view dinosaur evolution on the continent. In particular, characterizing these dinosaur faunas are important because:

    1. they clarify the transition between the extremely well sampled ecosystems of the Late Jurassic and the Late Cretaceous, and
    2. they provide data testing the hypothesis that a land bridge formed between Asia and North America during this time, allowing dinosaurs to disperse between these continents.

    Click to read the final report for the Excavation of New Fossil Vertebrates Localities in the Upper Jurassic and Upper Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation (BLM) project.

  • Assessment of Riparian Vegetation Monitoring Approaches (image)Abstract

    The National Park Service's Northern Colorado Plateau Inventory and Monitoring Network's (NCPN) main ambition with this project is to monitor long-term changes in key natural resources across the plateau.

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate the efficiency of sampling intensities, and to use the data collected on vegetative attributes to begin to estimate sample sizes required to detect specific levels of change over time.

  • Excavation and Identification of the Geologically Oldest Sauropod Dinosaur (image)Principal Investigator: John Foster, Museum of Moab

    The first dinosaur discovered in Utah, the sauropod Dystrophaeus viaemalae, was found in 1859 by 1. S. Newberry of the Macomb Expedition. The specimen is from the lower Tidwell Member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation (-160 mya) and is the only sauropod known from this member.

    This work plan proposes to return to the Dystrophaeus site, 155 years after its discovery, to excavate more complete and more diagnostic material of this sauropod to better identify how it fits into the evolutionary picture of these animals in North America.

  • Delicate Arch Sunset and Needles Sunrise photos (images)

    1st Place in the Canyon Country Photo Contest

    Delicate Arch Sunset
    by Esteban Azevedo

    The judges thought the composition, unique view, and execution of this photo were superb.

    2nd Place in the Canyon Country Photo Contest

    Needles Sunrise
    by David Crews

    David captured the sunrise coloring virga (precipitation that falls from a cloud but evaporates or sublimes before reaching the ground). The lighting and balance in the photo made it the choice for second place.

    Thank you to all who participated!

  • Paleontological Investigations of Comb RidgePrincipal Investigator: Robert J. Gay
    Public land agency: Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

    Robert Gay will engage students from Mission Heights Preparatory High School in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) by having them participate in a paleontological field school based at Comb Ridge in southeastern Utah. Students will work on site discovery, documentation, and excavation.

    While students are engaging in the field work they will also be gaining a greater appreciation of the natural world around them in general and that of Comb Ridge in particular.

    This project also furthers the goal of the BLM to advance public engagement and stewardship of paleontological resources within the Canyon Country District.

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    Posted By Tim Higgs

    Utah Noxious Weeds The Utah Noxious Weed list this past year has gone from 27 weeds to 54. They have changed from an A,B, and C weeds to class 1A, 1B, 2, 3, and Class 4. Tim will present what new and old weeds that are listed and what they look like. The Giant Reed or Arundo danax is the one residents and visitors should be aware of. This plant is a Class 1B weed, which is for early detection and rapid response.

  • Fossil AssemblagesPrincipal Investigators: Andrew R.C. Milner, Randall B. Irmis
    Public land agency: Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

    This research will test for paleolatitudinal differences in paleoenvironment and biota over the last eight million years of the Triassic Period. New data from the upper Chinle Formation in the Lisbon Valley and Indian Creek areas of southeastern Utah will be compared with existing data from similarly aged deposits in northern New Mexico.

    The second part of this project will prospect for, excavate, and describe the diverse new vertebrate fauna discovered during the 2013 field season including several bony fish taxa.

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    Posted By CNHA Editor

    MIC Lectures

    Join regional experts to learn more about the Moab region's fascinating past and present, places and people, wildlife, plants, dinosaurs and more! The Moab Information Center is conveniently located on the corner of Main & Center Streets in Moab, Utah.

    Talks begin at 6:00 P.M.—unless noted otherwise—and are FREE to the public.

    September 15, 2016
    Fremont Figurines: Little Artifact, Big Story
    David Yoder

    The Fremont (a prehistoric Native American culture) lived in Utah around 1000 years ago. These people made amazing human shaped clay figurines; some exquisitely decorated with painted tattoos, appliqued hairstyles, and jewelry, while others were plain and crude. Join me for an hour as we explore this cultural phenomenon. We'll view photographs of figurines from around the Fremont world and hear why these people may have made and used these intriguing artifacts.

    NPS photo by Jacob W Frank.jpgStars!
    September 22, 2016

    Seth Jarvis, Director of Clark Planetarium

    October 13, 2016
    ReBecca Hunt-Foster

    October 20, 2016

    Ann Axtell Morris: Art in Archaeology of the Southwest and Mesoamerica
    Sally Cole

    Archaeologist and artist Ann Axtell Morris accompanied her husband, archaeologist Earl Morris, on multi-year expeditions during the 1920s and 1930s in the U. S. Southwest and Mexico. She recorded architecture, rock art, murals, landscapes, Navajo lifeways, and expedition work in watercolor paintings and drawings and pioneered methods of documentation that remain in use today. Her works provide context for important sites including those of Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Chichen Itzá, Yucatan, and Mesa Verde National Park. The watercolors record ancient use of color in a time of black and white photography. In 1933, Ann wrote two books, Digging in Yucatan and Digging in the Southwest, that have inspired generations to know and be interested in the methods and goals of archaeology, pursue it as a career, and value the challenges in remote places.

    Archaeology—More info Soon!
    October 27, 2016
    Charmaine Thompson

    November 3, 2016
    Ranger Doug—More info Soon!

    Past Lectures

    Cover of Ancient Galleries of Cedar MesaAncient Galleries of Cedar Mesa
    Friday, September 2, 2016
    Dave Manley

    Dave will show his photographs from the book and share his experience documenting the incredible rock art of Cedar Mesa in Southeastern Utah. The greater Cedar Mesa area has been home to indigenous people for thousands of years. The cultures that came and went over time left a legacy of beautiful and intriguing marks on the rocks. Dave's crisp images show the breadth of the rock art found here, from isolated and simplistic to elaborately carved and/or painted panels. There will be book signings for Ancient Galleries of Cedar Mesa  on Saturday, September 3 at the Arches National Park visitor center bookstore from 9 A.M. – 11 A.M., and at the Canyonlands Island in the Sky visitor center bookstore from 1 P.M. – 3 P.M.

    August 18, 2016
    The Patterson Bundle
    Don Montoya

    Join BLM Archaeologist, Don Montoya, as he discusses the Patterson Bundle; a leather wrapped assemblage of Native American artifacts that was discovered in the Book Cliffs of southeastern Utah in the early 1980s. The Patterson Bundle was held and displayed temporarily at the Museum of Moab and at the Moab BLM Office. Due to government regulations the bundle was taken to the Utah Museum of Natural History where it resides today. Don's presentation will be about the Patterson Bundle and what we can do to bring it back to Moab.

    John FosterAugust 11, 2016
    1859 - Utah’s First Dinosaur Discovery

    John Foster

    In August of 1859 a military expedition led by Capt. John Macomb entered southeastern Utah on its way to find the confluence of the Colorado and Green rivers. Accompanying Macomb and his train of soldiers, surveyors, and mules was the expedition naturalist, John Newberry. On a cliff high above one of their camps Newberry, happened across what turned out to be the first dinosaur reported from Utah and the geologically oldest sauropod dinosaur known from North America. Unfortunately, the site was lost to history soon after when Newberry, Macomb, and the rest of the nation got entangled in the Civil War. But more than 115 years later, a Moab resident set out to relocate this important lost site.

    July 28, 2016
    Respect and Protect Public Awareness Campaign
    Ashley Losey & Dianne Olson

    Join the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Tread Lightly for the Moab kick off of Respect and Protect, our cultural resources public awareness campaign.  With this campaign, we hope to get the public interested their heritage and aware of ways to enjoy archaeological and paleontological sites responsibly.  We want Respect and Protect to catch people's attention, inform their behaviors, and give people the opportunity to act. We will be speaking about the campaign’s key messages and how we will be deploying that message locally and across the state.  Whether you attended our stakeholder meeting in June, are interested in partnering with us, or just curious, we would love to have you participate in an informative and fun evening at the MIC.

    May 5, 2016
    Eating Along the Edges of Agriculture
    Tim Riley

    Join Dr. Tim Riley, Curator of Archaeology at the Prehistoric Museum in Price, Utah, as he presents an evaluation of coprolite specimens from Fremont and Ancestral Puebloan sites as records of individual dietary decisions. Most archaeologists recognize that the Ancestral Puebloans were farmers heavily dependent on their staple crop of maize. Fremont diet has been seen as much more variable, with maize farming being only a part of their broader subsistence strategy. Coprolite specimens present a direct opportunity to compare and contrast the dietary patterns among these contemporary archaeological cultures. Patterns of dietary consumption related to seasonality, habitat exploitation and diet breadth are all present in the data available from coprolite specimens.

    Cave SpringsMay 12, 2016
    Cave Springs History
    Leigh Grench

    Cave Springs is a well known group of alcoves on BLM land within Squaw Park near the Yellowcat area. The alcoves have provided human shelter for over 8000 years with vestiges of this human passage both in the soil and on the walls. Unfortunately, graffiti has destroyed much of the ancient history and imagery. The BLM with a group of dedicated volunteers recently recorded all the names, dates, and prehistoric imagery at these impressive alcoves. The BLM and the MIC invite you to come and learn about this local history and how these alcoves and their riddles fit into the larger context of American history.

    Aerial PhotoMay 26, 2016
    It's Up In The Air: Conservation, Preservation and Protection of Eastern Utah's Cultural Resources on a Grand Scale
    Jody Patterson

    Balloons, kites, helicopters, and airplanes have been used to study archaeological sites and cultural landscapes since they first took to the air. Today’s technologies (airplanes, drones, small sensors, and GIS) and public citizen advocacy frameworks (citizen science and public-benefit flying) provide unprecedented opportunities take cultural resource preservation to a whole new height (pun intended). The combination of the citizen science movement, public-benefit flying, low-cost aerial technologies, and open source software can be combined to generate nearly real-time monitoring and data collection aimed at historic preservation in remote areas. This presentation will introduce these movements and technologies and discuss how to implement an aerial site stewardship program in eastern Utah based on their frameworks.

    Cliff Dwellings Speak BookJune 2, 2016
    Cliff Dwellings Speak—Deciphering the Ancient Cliff Dwellings of the American Southwest
    Beth & Bill Sagstetter

    Have you ever scrambled up a steep cliff to a cliff dwelling only to be disappointed when you finally arrived? Did it seem inscrutable and mute? It did to us for many years. After 40 years of researching and exploring cliff dwellings we discovered some little-known techniques for unraveling the mysteries of these ancient ruins, and we would like to share them with you. New and updated information!

    Dead Horse Point State ParkJune 9, 2016
    Dead Horse Point State Park
    Crystal White

    More info coming soon! (photo by Charlie Choc)

    Noxious WeedsJune 16, 2016
    Noxious Weeds
    Tim Higgs

     

     

    Colorado PikeminnowJuly 14, 2016
    Colorado Pikeminnow: Life History and Exciting Findings from the 2015 Field Season
    Christopher Michaud, Utah Division of Wildlife

    The Colorado Pikeminnow is the largest predatory fish native to the Colorado River Basin. Pikeminnow were once common but beginning in the 1930s, populations of this big river predatory fish began to decline. Originally listed as endangered by USFWS in 1967, Pikeminnow were given full protection under the Endangered Species Act in 1973. Today, the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program, a multi stakeholder partnership, is attempting to recover this imperiled species through an adaptive management strategy.  Chris will help us learn about the status this native fish.

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    Posted By CNHA Editor

    StarsJoin Seth Jarvis, Director of the Clark Planetarium in Salt Lake City, as he takes us on a journey through the stars! Seth has been an enthusiastic amateur astronomer since he built his first telescope at the age of 12. He started working for the Hansen Planetarium in Salt Lake City as an usher in 1978. He then went on to be one of the planetarium's first AstroVan outreach astronomy lecturers and traveled to rural Utah schools. Seth became the director of the Clark Planetarium when it opened in 2003. He is the author of several programs that now play in planetariums and science centers around the world.

    Come explore the night sky and learn what the stars have to teach us!

  • Mammal Response to Holocene Climate and Land Use Change on the Colorado PlateauPrincipal Investigator: M. Allison Stegner
    Public land agency: Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

    M. Allison Stegner's project seeks to answer the research question: How did the mammal community in the Canyon Rims area of southeastern Utah change through time, and how does it compare to the modern mammal community?

    This information will establish whether modern ecosystems are significantly altered from pre-industrial baselines, enabling public land managers to better prioritize conservation efforts.

  • MIC Lectures (Katrina)Artist Katrina Lund will share her experiences as the 2015 Community Artist in the Parks. Katrina spent many magical and inspiring times with visitors and locals alike, introducing them to a new way of seeing the lyrical landscapes of Arches, Canyonlands, Natural Bridges and Hovenweep. Moab Information Center, corner of Main & Center St. MIC Lectures are free and open to the public.

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    Posted By CNHA Editor

    Katrina-LundFor Katrina Lund, 2015 Community Artist in the Parks, the red rock desert is a very special place and art is a tool she uses to deepen her experience. Katrina loves to sketch plein air (outside), connecting with the striking landscape in front of her. She works in many different mediums, but loves combining pen and ink drawings with watercolors, capturing the raw energy and emotion of the desert. During her park visits and special events between April and October, Katrina hopes to engage and inspire visitors and locals alike with a different way to see these wild and beautiful places.

    Katrina hopes to share sketching with the visitors she meets in the parks, as another tool to deepen their experience. "You don't have to consider yourself an 'artist' to feel the joy and magic of sketching in these beautiful places."

    Katrina will also be hosting monthly sketch crawls. A sketch crawl is where people go from location to location in the park to sketch. All ages and levels are welcome. Join Katrina for all or part of the sketch crawl (see schedule below). She will offer drawing tips and demos. Art supplies are limited, so if you have your own, please bring them. Also bring water, sunscreen and a hat.

    Click to learn more about Katrina and check her schedule.

  • WallPrincipal Investigator: Donald C. Irwin, District Heritage Manager, Moab-Monticello Ranger District of the Manti-La Sal National Forest.

    The principle aim of this project is to collect additional field data from a selection of important Pueblo I period ancestral Puebloan sites within the Monticello Ranger District of the Manti-La Sal National Forest.

    This project will collect additional field data to understand the chronology, social interaction, economy, and settlement in the area.

    It will also help to address the significance and relevance of the Pueblo I complex to the greater region.

  • Principal Investigator: Lindsay E. Zanno, PhD
    Public land agency: Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

    Dr. Zanno's team will excavate a new species of plant-eating ornithopod dinosaur discovered during the CNHA sponsored expedition in 2014 to the Mussentuchit area in southeastern Utah.

    A second aim of this project is to obtain radiometric dating and stratigraphic assessment of the Mussentuchit in the area of the fossil discoveries to determine the stratigraphic context and increase temporal resolution.

  • Erigeron Mancus Elevational Density Gradient as a Baseline to Detect Future Climate Change in La Sal Mountain Habitats

    Erigeron Mancus Elevational Density Gradient as a BaselineAbstract

    The La Sal Daisy, Erigeron mancus Rydb., is endemic to timberline and alpine habitats of the La Sal Mountains in Utah, an insular, laccolithic mountain range on the Colorado Plateau in southeastern Utah. It occurs in alpine herbaceous communities from timberline to the crestline of the La Sals.

    Our primary goal in this study was to measure basic population biology parameters for the E. mancus population on the ridge from Mt. Laurel in the Middle Group of the La Sals west to treeline. We measured both E. mancus density and vascular plant species composition within 1-m × 1-m square frames along a ridgeline transect in mid-July near peak flowering time. Mean density was 7.09 plants/m2 which yielded a population estimate of over 200,000 plants along Mt. Laurel ridge and its nearby southern crestline. Density does not appear to change significantly with elevation since the standard errors of the density estimates of the three main patches overlap. The elevation of the sampled E. mancus population centroid weighted by E. mancus density was 3537 m (12,330 ft) which is within the largest patch near a shallow windswept saddle. Vascular plant diversity along the Mt. Laurel ridge transects averaged 17 ± 0.58 SE species per square meter with a richness range of 10-26 species per square meter.

    This study provides baseline data on the population biology of E. mancus which will then allow future re-measurements of density, population size, and elevational centroid to indicate population trends in response to climate change and anthropogenic stressors.

    Download PDF

  • SmallpairofchildrenssandalsAgency: Bureau of Land Management
    Principal Investigator: Laurie D. Webster

    This project will survey and photo-document approximately 500 archaeological textiles, baskets, and other perishable artifacts in the Green and Lang collections at the Field Museum of Natural History from Grand Gulch and adjacent lands managed by the Monticello Field Office of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Excavated more than a century ago, most of these collections are still unpublished and unknown to archaeologists, land managers, and the general public.

    Basketmaker II twined sandals from the Grand Gulch area recorded by the Wetherill-Grand Gulch Research Project.

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    Posted By CNHA Editor

    Pika Forage CloseupAbstract

    The American pika, Ochotona princeps, has been referred to as a canary in the coal mine when it comes to climate change. This small rabbit relative inhabits cool alpine and subalpine mountain areas and has been shown to be sensitive to higher temperatures from both physiological experiments and from past climate transitions in the late Quaternary. Both the pika and its many forage plant species may respond to increasing temperatures due to global warming, but in what way? This research measured both soil surface temperature and plant species composition within and outside of the normal pika foraging zone in order to establish a baseline for future species comparison and temperature change comparisons.

    Download Distance and Temperature Effects on Pika Forage (PDF)

  • With the Colorado Plateau being home to some of the darkest night skies in the United States, it is no wonder Dead Horse Point State Park has become a hot spot for viewing, and photographing the night sky. Join Ranger Crystal White, Assistant Manager/Night Sky Ranger at Dead Horse Point State Park, and learn more about the park's quest to become an International Dark Sky Park, its committed to protecting natural darkness, and educating those that visit on the importance of dark skies. (photo courtesy of Brett Edge).

  • Day-Use Permits Now Required for Elephant Hill and White Rim Roads

    The National Park Service has announced permits will be required for all motor vehicle and bicycle day use on the White Rim and Elephant Hill roads in Canyonlands National Park beginning September 1, 2015.

    Day-use permits will be available on Canyonlands National Park's official website 24 hours in advance of the trip date. Some permits for each day will also be available—first-come, first-served—at the Island in the Sky Visitor Center.

    Salt Creek, Horse Creek, and Lavender Canyon day-use permits will now also be available—first-come, first-served—on the park's official website beginning 24 hours in advance of the trip date. Permits for these areas will no longer be available up to four months in advance. No fee will be charged for these day-use permits during the 2015 – 2016 seasons.

    For more details, visit the Canyonlands National Park website.

  • WEBmountainlionsandalsmPrincipal Investigator: Laurie D. Webster, Ph.D.

    Webster will return to the Field Museum of Natural History in 2012 to complete the survey and documentation of approximately 700 archaeological textiles, baskets, and other perishable artifacts in the Green and Lang collections at the Field Museum of Natural History. These collections were removed from federal lands in southeastern Utah over a century ago.

    A feather, fur, and wood specialist will also be brought in to examine and identify artifact materials, and several artifact samples will be submitted for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) dating.

    Webster was the recipient of a 2011 Discovery Pool grant which began her work on this project. In 2011, she recorded basic descriptive information about 400 perishable artifacts and generated 1,100 digital photographs of these collections.

    Despite their excellent condition and clear archaeological significance, these collections are almost completely unknown to archaeologists, perishables specialists, land managers, indigenous communities, and the general public.

  • Community Artist in the Parks ScheduleKatrina hopes to share sketching with the visitors she meets in the parks, as another tool to deepen their experience. "You don't have to consider yourself an 'artist' to feel the joy and magic of sketching and truly connecting on a different level to these wild and beautiful places."

    June Schedule

    Friday, June 5: Canyonlands National Park—Island in the Sky District
    Green River Overlook 5 P.M. – 8 P.M.

    Saturday, June 6: Canyonlands National Park—Island in the Sky District
    Sketch Crawl Event

    Mesa Arch 6 A.M. – 9 A.M.
    Green River Overlook 9 A.M. – 12 noon
    Upheaval Dome Overlook 12:30 P.M. – 3:30 P.M.
    Grand View Point Overlook 4 P.M. – 8:30 P.M.

    Sunday, June 7: Canyonlands National Park – Island in the Sky District
    Island in the Sky Visitor Center 10 A.M. – 12:30 P.M.

    Thursday, June 11 – Monday, June 15: Canyonlands National Park
    - Green River Stillwater Canyon River Trip

    Sunday, June 21: Arches National Park
    Arches Visitor Center 2:30 P.M. – 4:30 P.M.
    Delicate Arch 5 P.M. – 8:30 P.M.

  • Climate Driven Changes in Englemann Spruce Stands in the La Sal MountainsPrincipal Investigators: Jim Fowler, with Barb Smith & Steve Overby

    Research question to be addressed: Will timberline elevation change with global warming? Will Engelmann spruce stand density, stand structure, carbon storage, and understory composition change with global warming and a changing precipitation pattern? This study will establish baseline data to answer these questions.

  • BLMsherdsPrincipal Investigator: Fumi Arakawa

    An important question in southwestern archaeological research is how social and economic ties between prehistoric groups changed through time. This study will use chemical matching of ceramics from the Goodman Point Unit of Hovenweep National Monument to material source areas in order to address this question. The results will provide the National Park Service with information to manage, preserve, and interpret the unit. Interpretations will also be made available to the general public.

  • Ceramic Analysis of Sherd Collections from Hovenweep National MonumentCeramic Analysis of Sherd Collections from Hovenweep National Monument

    Principal co-investigators: Mark Bond, Jonathan Till, Ben Bellorado, Abajo Archaeology, LLC

    Hovenweep National Monument's ceramic collection is housed in three separate locations: the SEUG facility, the Anasazi Heritage Center, and the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology.

    This project seeks to bring the collection to one place for examination, sort through the sherds, organize the data gleaned from the ceramic collection, use the data to answer research questions and provide interpretive information, and put forward recommendations on particular sherds useful for additional, deeper study.

    The data will help archeologists learn more about such topics as prehistoric ceramic exchange, and help to isolate the date ranges associated with Hovenweep sites. If an assemblage from a site is relatively large and has context, analysis may yield data that can look at site function.

    Additional studies might also be able to address questions pertaining to ceramic technology. All of this data can then be used to develop interpretive programs and exhibits and help the Hovenweep visitor better understand the prehistory of the area.

  • 99th Birthday Celebration with Free Admission to National Parks on August 25th

    National Park BirthdayPark Service's 99th birthday is August 25, 2015. In celebration, all National Park units will offer free admission. It's a perfect time to visit Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, Natural Bridges Monument, and Hovenweep National Monument. Come out and celebrate your national parks!

  • BenBelloradopicsmCedar Mesa Building Murals and Social Identities Project: Phase II

    Principal Investigator: Benjamin A. Bellorado
    Public land agency: Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

    This phase of the project will continue the inventory of the remaining Ancestral Puebloan building murals in the Cedar Mesa area and define their context, content, and chronology across the larger landscape. The aim will be to visit sites with painted and inscribed murals, and identify murals in areas not visited during the first phase in 2014.

    Through non-invasive methods (survey, mapping, and tree-ring sampling), this project will provide public land managers with an inventory of these uniquely important and fragile resources before they are further impacted by increasing visitation to the Cedar Mesa area.

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    Posted By CNHA Editor

    Cedar Mesa Building Murals and Social Identities ProjectCedar Mesa Building Murals and Social Identities Project (BLM)

    Principal Investigator: Ben Bellorado, M.A., University of Arizona, School of Anthropology

    This project seeks to continue an inventory of the remaining building murals in the Cedar Mesa area, in southeastern Utah, to define the context, content, and chronology of these building murals across the larger landscape and through time. The methods used in this research will contribute to an assessment of the broader styles of building murals across a larger social landscape of Cedar Mesa during the Pueblo II and III periods (950 – 1300 CE).

  • Dark Sky ParkThe International Dark-Sky Association (IDA) has granted Gold-Tier International Dark Sky Park status to Canyonlands National Park, an honor reserved for the darkest of dark skies and the most stunning of starscapes.

    "It is truly a pleasure to recognize efforts at Canyonlands to expand the reach of dark skies protections across the Colorado Plateau," IDA executive director, J. Scott Feierabend said. "The park's achievement helps bring the awe-inspiring experience of an authentically dark, natural night to more than half a million visitors a year."

    Canyonlands was designated a national park in 1964 and provides visitors opportunities to view spectacular scenery, explore rugged landscapes, and experience remote wildness and solitude. The stunning scenery and expansive landscapes of Canyonlands don't end when the sun sets.

    "The Milky Way stretching across the park's incredibly dark night sky is a sight many visitors will never forget," said Canyonlands superintendent, Kate Cannon. "With this gold-tier designation, the IDA recognizes the importance of the natural darkness found here."

    Efforts to preserve natural darkness in Canyonlands began several years ago with a focused effort to revamp and replace park lighting with night-sky friendly bulbs and fixtures. Nearly 100 percent of the park's lights are now night-sky friendly. Natural darkness is also recognized in park management documents, which clearly state the value of night skies and the park's commitment to protect them.

    Visitors from all over the world attend night sky programs at the Island in the Sky and Needles districts of the park where rangers use story-telling and telescopes to introduce the wonders of the universe to park visitors. Many of these visitors have never seen the Milky Way or a star-filled sky due to where they live. In many national parks, astronomy events are the most popular ranger-led programs, and astrotourism enhances economic benefits to nearby communities.

    Canyonlands National Park is one of four national parks included in the National Park Service's Southeast Utah Group. These parks include Hovenweep National Monument, awarded an International Dark Sky Park in 2014, and Natural Bridges National Monument, which was designated the world's first International Dark Sky Park in 2007. Arches National Park is also included in the Southeast Utah Group. The four parks work together with neighboring businesses, communities, and land managers to help conserve some of the darkest skies in the United States.

    Click here to learn more about the dark sky program.

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    Posted By CNHA Editor

    Arches National Park webcamYou can now check to see if there is a line at the entrance to Arches National Park. Cameras show the view at either end of the Arches entrance road and the view is updated every 60 seconds. Click here to view the webcam at Arches National Park. There is also a link to traffic and travel tips available there also.

    To avoid long lines at the entrance gate and parking congestion, plan your visit before 8 A.M. or after 3 P.M.. Late afternoon and evening visits can be the most enjoyable—the lighting is better for photography and viewing the park features, temperatures are cooler, and the parking areas and trails are less crowded.

  • With the return of spring, many climbing routes or features inside Arches National Park again have been temporarily closed to rock climbing to protect sensitive wildlife species in accordance with the authority of Title 36 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 1, Section 1.5(a)(1).

    The latest information on the status of temporary closures can be found on the climbing page of the park's official website.

    Effective immediately, popular climbing routes on the feature known as The Three Penguins have been added to the list of temporary closures this season due to the presence of raptors displaying breeding behavior.

    General information about Arches National Park can be found at nps.gov/arch.

  • Arches and Canyonlands National Parks Seek Public Input on Proposed Fee Increases and Congestion Management Strategies

    The National Park Service is seeking public comment on a proposal to raise entrance, campground, and Fiery Furnace fees at Arches National Park and Canyonlands National Park, as well as input regarding strategies to manage vehicle congestion.

    For more information, visit http://www.nps.gov/arch/parknews/news011015.htm.

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    Posted By CNHA Editor

    Maggie Logowitz

    Madeline "Maddie" Logowitz is fascinated by the creatures and plants of canyon country. "The spareness of the desert invites you to notice each beetle, each tree, each lizard standing on its own. Creating art affords me a way to share my wonder of this small-scale world."

    Maddie rediscovered sketching while working on ecological research in Moab. As her understanding of the area deepened, so did her desire to capture and share her love of the desert. Her ink and watercolor paintings showcase the weird and wonderful life that thrives in the canyons.

    You are invited to join Maddie for a fun and inspiring experience in the park. Please see the CNHA event schedule  for dates, times and locations.

    Photo courtesy of Madeline Logowitz

  • Ceramic Sherd Collections from Hovenweep National MonumentPhase II of Analysis of Ceramic Sherd Collections from Hovenweep National Monument (NPS)

    Principal Investigators: Jonathan Till, Mark Bond, Tamara Desrosiers, Abajo Archaeology, LLC. Agency Personnel: Chris Goetze, Cultural Resource Program Manager, NPS Southeast Utah Group; Sharyl Kinnear-Ferris, Archeologist, NPS Southeast Utah Group.

    Basic analysis of approximately 2,500 additional sherds in the collection will be completed.

    500 rim sherds from several of the largest collected site assemblages will be examined for temper and rim arc data. Additionally, about 250 of these sherds will be studied for design attributes.

    Rim arc data will help derive a better understanding of vessel size distributions at sites. The temper data will contribute significantly to the understanding of pottery manufacture as well as social organization and exchange relationships at both local and regional levels.

  • Northern Colorado Plateau Network Inventory and Monitoring Program

    Biological and Physical Relationships of Spring and Seep EcosystemsAbstract

    The Northern Colorado Plateau Network (NCPN) has selected springs as a vital sign for monitoring and is currently investigating the use of aquatic macroinvertebrate species assemblages as an indicator of ecosystem health.

    The relationship between anthropogenic disturbance and aquatic macroinvertebrate community species composition at springs on the Colorado Plateau is unclear. NCPN staff and cooperators visited 45 springs and hanging gardens in six national park units and on surrounding public lands. Forty springs were divided into impact categories based on visible disturbances at the site and measures of soil and riparian area integrity.

    We were able to detect differences in vegetation, water temperature, turbidity, and E. coli presence at high impact sites versus low and moderate impact sites. Despite these differences, overall patterns indicate that aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages and metrics do not differ between springs with different levels and types of anthropogenic impacts. Amphipod and non-insect richness were the only invertebrates that showed any differences, peaking at moderately disturbed sites and with lowest richness at highly disturbed sites.

    Based on our dataset, we recommend that aquatic macroinvertebrate sampling not be included in long-term monitoring as a surrogate method for determining anthropogenic impacts at springs and seeps on the Northern Colorado Plateau.

    Download Assessment of Biological and Physical Relationships of Spring and Seep Ecosystems Across a Gradient of Human Impacts (PDF)

  • Posted By Barbara Webb

    Longbow Arch - photo by Peggy McNeilThe trail starts from the Poison Spider parking lot, where you park your car. Start on the trail to the dinosaur tracks. You will come to a sign where the trail splits and will direct you to Longbow Arch.  I consider this trail to be a moderate trail. There are some steep climbs on slickrock. At one spot you can see the handles the Bureau of Land Management installed to help hikers get up and down. On the slickrock, the trail is marked by green painted lines. More than half the trail is spent walking in sand. By summer it will be thick to walk in. When walking in the sand, the trail is marked by small metal flags with blue plastic on them. There is a smaller arch on the trail before you get to Longbow. Longbow Arch itself is between two fins.You can walk right up to it. It is an impressive 60-foot-long arch. The weather was so warm on the hike, and all of the plants were in bloom. I spotted claret cup cacti, Mormon tea, and Phlox. On my way back, I got to enjoy some strange cloud formations in the open sky.  The handles you can use to help you climb the slickrock.

    Hike Length: 1.2 miles to Longbow Arch; 2.4 miles round trip
    Difficulty: Moderate
    Directions to Trailhead: Head 4.1 miles north of Moab, Utah on Highway 191. Turn left onto Highway 279 (Potash Road) and continue on for 5.9 miles to the Poison Spider parking area. The trail is off the parking area.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Edge of the Cedars State Park MuseumEdge of the Cedars Lecture by R.E. Burrillo The Lens of History: Documenting Impacts to Archaeological Sites on Cedar Mesa through Comparative Photography. Lecture is free. Edge of the Cedars Museum is located at 660 W 400 N, Blanding, UT 84511. 435-678-2238. Visit the Edge of the Cedars State Park Museum web page to learn more.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    2016 Artist in the Parks - Maddie LogowitzOctober 10, 2016 2017 Artist in the Parks Program Applications Being Accepted  The Southeast Utah Group of parks is now accepting applications for the 2017 Community Artist in the Parks (CAIP) program.
    Created in 2009, the CAIP program highlights the connection between local artists and the surrounding landscape, particularly Arches and Canyonlands national parks and Hovenweep and Natural Bridges national monuments.
    For more program details and application information, visit the Community Artist in the Parks Program webpage.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Volunteers helping clean up on NLPD in 2013September 24, 2016 Lend a Hand on National Public Lands Day Volunteer for National Public Lands Day (NPLD), the nation's largest, single-day volunteer event for public lands in the United States. Spend time outdoors participating in projects like pulling invasive species, maintaining trails, picking up trash, and more. Your work will help ensure our public lands continue to be beautiful places for all to enjoy! National Public Lands Day is also a fee-free day for all federal public lands including Arches & Canyonlands National Parks and Natural Bridges & Hovenweep National Monuments. To find out about NPLD volunteer opportunities in the Moab area, visit: https://www.neefusa.org/find-an-event/UT.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Photo by BLMAugust 14, 2016 Jurassic Walk and Talk at the Dinosaur Stomping Ground Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at 9 am. Also, at 6pm, meet on the Moab Information Center back patio for “Bones, Stones, and Fossil Zones”—a free paleontology talk about the Moab area’s dinosaurs.  For directions, visit the Dinosaur Stomping Ground web page.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Poison Spider Dinosaur TrackwayAugust 13, 2016 Jurassic Walk and Talk at the Poison Spider Dinosaur Trackway Join a BLM paleontologist for a free walk with dinosaurs at 9 am. Also, at 6pm, meet on the Moab Information Center back patio for “Dino Tracks and Facts”—a free paleontology talk about dinosaur tracks found in the Moab area.  For directions, visit the Poison Spider Dinosaur Trackway web page.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Bull Canyon Overlook TracksiteJuly 26, 2016 Bull Canyon Overlook Tracksite Dedication The Moab District of the Manti-La Sal National Forest is pleased to announce the completion of an interpretive site at Bull Canyon Overlook.  This site interprets an impressive Jurassic-age dinosaur tracksite with numerous well-preserved theropod tracks. Educational and informational panels, parking, a restroom and a trail were all constructed as part of this project. For directions, visit the Manti-La Sal website.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Canyonlands Half Dome by Mark StaceyDecember 16, 2016 Canyonlands Visitor Centers Close for Winter Canyonlands National Park is open all year, but the park's visitor center operations change with the arrival of winter. The Needles Visitor Center closed for the winter on Saturday, November 26, 2016 and will reopen on Monday, March 6, 2017. The Island in the Sky Visitor Center will be closed Christmas Day. It will close for the winter on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 and reopen on Friday, March 3, 2017. Law enforcement staff will remain on duty in the park throughout the winter. Visit the Canyonlands National Park Operating Hours & Seasons web page for more information.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Madeline LogowitzFebruary 01, 2016 2016 Community Artist Announced The National Park Service's Southeast Utah Group (Arches and Canyonlands National Parks and Hovenweep and Natural Bridges National Monuments) is pleased to announce that Madeline Logowitz has been selected as the 2016 Community Artist in the Parks (CAIP).

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Arches webcamMarch 16, 2016 Arches Traffic Cameras Now Online Cameras at Arches National Park allow you to see if there is a line at the Arches entrance.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Hanksville Dinosaur QuarryMay 26, 2016 Free Public Tours of Hanksville Dinosaur Quarry Begin May 27th The education staff from the Burpee Museum will lead tours at 11am, 1pm and 3pm and talk about current and past excavations.Click here for directions and more information.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Westwater rapids on the ColoradoJune 9, 2016 Colorado and Green Rivers Rising as Snow Melts The west side of the White Rim Road in Canyonlands National Park is flooded & impassible to most vehicles. For updates contact the Island in the Sky Visitor Center: (435) 259-4712. Also, if you are boating, high flows can change the river dramatically, limiting campsites and making pulling into shore difficult. Have fun and be safe! You can check current river flows here.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Roxanne BiermanJune 10, 2016 Roxanne Bierman Named Executive Director of CNHA Canyonlands Natural History Association is pleased to announce that Roxanne Bierman has been named Executive Director of CNHA.  Roxanne comes to CNHA from the Grand Teton Association, where she served in many capacities during her twenty-five year career there, working her way up to Director of Operations, a position she held since 2004. Roxanne brings a wealth of experience in human resources, retail management, and operations management that will be an asset as she leads CNHA.  Roxanne takes the helm from Cindy Hardgrave, who has retired after heading CNHA for seventeen successful years.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Fire RestrictionsJune 30, 2016 High Fire Danger Prompts Fire Restrictions Weather conditions coupled with extremely dry conditions throughout Southeast Utah have created hazardous fire conditions. As a result, as of, July 1, 2016, all State, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and National Park Service lands and all unincorporated private lands in the following lands are under fire restrictions.This affects:

    • State Lands and unincorporated private lands below 7000 feet in Carbon, Emery, Grand and San Juan Counties
    • BLM lands below 7000 feet in southeastern Carbon, Emery, Grand and San Juan Counties
    • National Park Service including Canyonlands and Arches national parks plus Natural Bridges and Hovenweep national monuments. Restrictions include: No campfires, except in permanently constructed cement or metal fire pits provided in developed campgrounds and picnic areas. No smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle or building, a developed recreation site or while stopped in an area that is paved, barren or cleared to mineral soil. Information on statewide fire restrictions can be found here.
  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Photo Contest WinnersNovember 25, 2015 Winners of the 2015 Canyon Country Photo Contest Selected 1st Place—Delicate Arch Sunset by Esteban Azevedo. 2nd Place goes to Needles Sunrise by David Crews.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Natural Bridges National MonumentOctober 2016  Natural Bridges & Hovenweep National Monuments Winter Hours The visitor centers at Natural Bridges and Hovenweep will be closed on Tuesdays & Wednesdays from October 18, 2016 - April 17, 2017.  The visitor centers will be open Sun., Mon., Thurs., Fri., & Sat. from 9 am to 5 pm. The monuments and camgrounds remain open year- round. Trails at Hovenweep are open from sunrise to sunset. Learn more at the Natural Bridges National Monument website and the Hovenweep National Monument website.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein
    FULL

    Art cards by Maddie LogowitzNovember 4, 2016, 4:30 - 6 pm Collaborative Art Project Come to the Moab Information Center and add your words to a fantastic final project by the 2016 Community Artist in the Parks, Maddie Logowitz! Meet her and chat about her year of inspiring visitor contacts in Arches, Canyonlands, Natural Bridges and Hovenweep. The Moab Information Center is located at the corner of Center and Main streets, in downtown Moab. Visit the Artist in the Parks Program web page for more about this wonderful program..

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Kane Gulch Ranger Station on Cedar MesaOctober 29, 2016 Opening of the Kane Gulch Ranger Station Rock Art Exhibit The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Monticello Field Office invites the public to an open house at the Kane Gulch Ranger Station on Saturday, Oct. 29, 2016 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. to view the new exhibit “Cedar Mesa Through Time: Place, Archaeology, and Culture”. The exhibit will provide visitors with photographs, drawings, and descriptions of key characteristics of rock art from earliest inhabitants to present day cultures. A team of experts will be honored led by Dr. Sally Cole and Laura Lantz, who contributed hours of extensive research of rock art, archaeology, geology, and ecology of the Cedar Mesa area for the exhibit. Light refreshments and snacks will be served. The Kane Gulch Ranger Station is located in southwestern Utah along Utah Highway 261 about four miles south of Highway 95, not far from Natural Bridges National Monument..

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Entrance station at Arches National ParkOctober 20-23, 2016 Arches and Canyonlands national parks are expecting record visitation this weekend Arches and Canyonlands national parks are expecting record visitation during the fall recess of Utah public schools, October 20 – 23. Officials are advising visitors to expect heavy traffic, crowded trails, and limited parking. They also recommend that visitors enter the parks before 9 a.m. or after noon to avoid entry line wait times that may exceed one hour. Moab area accommodations and campgrounds are likely be full. Visit the Arches National Park news page to learn more.

  • Tags:

    Posted By CNHA Editor

    New Stamp Features Delicate ArchThe U.S. Postal Service (USPS) recently previewed the second in its series of 16 Forever Stamps commemorating the centennial of the National Park Service (NPS). The 16 stamps, intended to represent the diversity of areas in our national park system, are being previewed over the next three weeks.

    The stamp image is a photograph by Tom Till of Moab, Utah, and represents the iconic Delicate Arch in Arches National Park.

    The June 2 first-day-of-issue ceremony for the National Parks Forever Stamps pane will take place at New York City's Javits Center.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Birds in Rock ArtOctober 22, 2015 MIC Lecture - Birds in Ancestral Pueblo Rock Art and Culture by Sally Cole Free MIC lecture, Oct. 22 at 6 pm.Learn about rock art images of birds in the Four Corners region from about 1000 – 400 BCE and CE 1700 and the complex relationships between Puebloan peoples and birds over time.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Ancient TextilesSeptember 24, 2015 MIC Lecture: Re-excavating the Past: New Work with Ancient Textiles, Baskets, Wood, and Hides from Southeastern Utah: A CNHA Discovery Pool Project Textile expert Laurie Webster will discuss the fascinating histories of some remarkable 1000 – 2000-year-old textiles, baskets, sandals, and other perishable artifacts. Thurs., 9/24 at 6 pm at the Moab Information Center. Corner of Main & Center St.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    September 15, 2015 MIC Lecture: STARS! Join Seth Jarvis, Director of the Clark Planetarium, as he takes us on a journey through the stars! Thurs. 9/17 at 6 pm. Moab Information Center, corner of Center & Main St.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    August 31, 2015 Canyonlands National Park Named International Dark Sky Park The International Dark-Sky Association (IDA) has granted Gold-Tier International Dark Sky Park status to Canyonlands National Park, an honor reserved for the darkest of dark skies and the most stunning of starscapes.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    August 27, 2015 MIC Lecture: Telling the Tell Free MIC lecture: Thu. Aug 27 at 6 pm. Join Don Montoya as he presents a Native American oral narrative accompanied by Karen Clark, Lakota Way Practitioner. Oral tradition is cultural knowledge transmitted orally from one generation to another.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    August 20, 2015 MIC Lecture: San Juan Red Ware Pottery Production and Exchange Join Jim Allison for his talk at the MIC on 8/20 at 6 pm. Red ware pottery exchange linked Ancestral Pueblo people across the region through complex networks of interaction that cross-cut apparent differences among social groups.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    August 11, 2015 Day-Use Permits Now Required for Elephant Hill and White Rim Roads The National Park Service has announced that permits will be required for all motor vehicle and bicycle day use on the White Rim and Elephant Hill roads in Canyonlands National Park beginning September 1, 2015.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    May 05, 2015 Arches National Park Resumes Temporary Closure of Climbing Routes With the return of spring, many climbing routes or features inside Arches National Park again have been temporarily closed to rock climbing to protect sensitive wildlife species.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    The Mickelsen Pot discovered in Central UTah

    Big Fuss About a Small Pot: The Mickelsen Pot from Central Utah
    October 27, 2016
    Charmaine Thompson

    Utah was occupied between about 100 BC and AD 1300 by two groups of people who farmed, lived in villages, and made beautiful pottery. Archaeologically, we call them by different names, the Fremont in central and northern Utah, and the Ancestral Puebloans in southern Utah. Who were these people, and what was the nature of their relationship? The amazing discovery of a whole Ancestral Puebloan ceramic vessel in central Utah give us insights into these questions. This little pot provides us with a window into a time in ancient Utah when people were on the move and creating spheres of interaction that affected their lives in profound ways. It also reminds us about the connection between modern Puebloan people and their ancient Utah ancestors.   

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Ann Axtell Morris - Art in ArchaeologyAnn Axtell Morris: Art in Archaeology of the Southwest and Mesoamerica
    October 20, 2016
    Sally Cole

    Archaeologist and artist Ann Axtell Morris accompanied her husband, archaeologist Earl Morris, on multi-year expeditions during the 1920s and 1930s in the U. S. Southwest and Mexico. She recorded architecture, rock art, murals, landscapes, Navajo lifeways, and expedition work in watercolor paintings and drawings and pioneered methods of documentation that remain in use today. Her works provide context for important sites including those of Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Chichen Itzá, Yucatan, and Mesa Verde National Park. The watercolors record ancient use of color in a time of black and white photography.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Tracks at Moab's Dinosaur Stomping GroundsWalking with Dinosaurs in Moab
    October 13, 2016

    ReBecca Hunt Foster

    Join BLM Paleontologist ReBecca Hunt-foster to learn about where you can go to walk with the dinosaurs around Moab. ReBecca will discuss free places that you can visit to see real dinosaur bone and tracks in the Moab area. Questions such as: “What should I do if I find a dinosaur?”, “How old are these fossils?”, and “Why are all these dinosaurs preserved here?” will be answered.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    NPS photo by Jacob W Frank.jpgOur National Parks-Celebrating the Centennial, Preparing for the Bicentennial
    September 22, 2016

    Seth Jarvis, Director of Clark Planetarium

    Join the Director of the Clark Planetarium (in Salt Lake City), Seth Jarvis, as he takes us on a journey through the stars to celebrate the 100th birthday of the National Parks system! Seth Jarvis has been an enthusiastic, amateur astronomer since he built his first telescope at the age of 12. He started working for the Hansen Planetarium in Salt Lake City as an usher in 1978. He then went on to be one of the planetarium’s first “AstroVan” outreach astronomy lecturers and traveled to rural Utah schools. Seth became the director of the Clark Planetarium when it opened in 2003. He is the author of several programs that now play in planetariums and science centers around the world. Come explore the night sky and learn what the stars have to teach us!

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    September 15, 2016
    Fremont Figurines: Little Artifact, Big Story
    David Yoder

    The Fremont (a prehistoric Native American culture) lived in Utah around 1000 years ago. These people made amazing human shaped clay figurines; some exquisitely decorated with painted tattoos, appliqued hairstyles, and jewelry, while others were plain and crude. Join me for an hour as we explore this cultural phenomenon. We'll view photographs of figurines from around the Fremont world and hear why these people may have made and used these intriguing artifacts.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Cover of Ancient Galleries of Cedar MesaAncient Galleries of Cedar Mesa
    Friday, September 2, 2016
    Dave Manley

    Dave will show his photographs from the book and share his experience documenting the incredible rock art of Cedar Mesa in Southeastern Utah. The greater Cedar Mesa area has been home to indigenous people for thousands of years. The cultures that came and went over time left a legacy of beautiful and intriguing marks on the rocks. Dave's crisp images show the breadth of the rock art found here, from isolated and simplistic to elaboratly carved and/or painted panels. There will be booksignings for Ancient Galleries of Cedar Mesa  on Saturday, September 3 at the Arches National Park visitor center bookstore from 9 A.M. – 11 A.M., and at the Canyonlands Island in the Sky visitor center bookstore from 1 P.M. – 3 P.M.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    August 18, 2016
    The Patterson Bundle
    Don Montoya

    Join BLM Archaeologist, Don Montoya, as he discusses the Patterson Bundle; a leather wrapped assemblage of Native American artifacts that was discovered in the Book Cliffs of southeastern Utah in the early 1980s. The Patterson Bundle was held and displayed temporarily at the Museum of Moab and at the Moab BLM Office. Due to government regulations the bundle was taken to the Utah Museum of Natural History where it resides today. Don's presentation will be about the Patterson Bundle and what we can do to bring it back to Moab.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    1859—Utah’s First Dinosaur DiscoveryAugust 11, 2016
    1859—Utah’s First Dinosaur Discovery

    John Foster

    In August of 1859 a military expedition led by Capt. John Macomb entered southeastern Utah on its way to find the confluence of the Colorado and Green rivers. Accompanying Macomb and his train of soldiers, surveyors, and mules was the expedition naturalist, John Newberry. On a cliff high above one of their camps Newberry, happened across what turned out to be the first dinosaur reported from Utah and the geologically oldest sauropod dinosaur known from North America. Unfortunately, the site was lost to history soon after when Newberry, Macomb, and the rest of the nation got entangled in the Civil War. But more than 115 years later, a Moab resident set out to relocate this important lost site.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    BLM Respect and Protect logoJuly 28, 2016
    Respect and Protect Public Awareness Campaign
    Ashley Losey & Dianne Olson

    Join the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Tread Lightly for the Moab kick off of Respect and Protect, our cultural resources public awareness campaign.  With this campaign, we hope to get the public interested their heritage and aware of ways to enjoy archaeological and paleontological sites responsibly.  We want Respect and Protect to catch people's attention, inform their behaviors, and give people the opportunity to act. We will be speaking about the campaign’s key messages and how we will be deploying that message locally and across the state.  Whether you attended our stakeholder meeting in June, are interested in partnering with us, or just curious, we would love to have you participate in an informative and fun evening at the MIC.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    May 5, 2016
    Eating Along the Edges of Agriculture
    Tim Riley

    Join Dr. Tim Riley, Curator of Archaeology at the Prehistoric Museum in Price, Utah, as he presents an evaluation of coprolite specimens from Fremont and Ancestral Puebloan sites as records of individual dietary decisions. Most archaeologists recognize that the Ancestral Puebloans were farmers heavily dependent on their staple crop of maize. Fremont diet has been seen as much more variable, with maize farming being only a part of their broader subsistence strategy. Coprolite specimens present a direct opportunity to compare and contrast the dietary patterns among these contemporary archaeological cultures. Patterns of dietary consumption related to seasonality, habitat exploitation and diet breadth are all present in the data available from coprolite specimens.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    It's Up In The Air:May 26, 2016
    It's Up In The Air: Conservation, Preservation and Protection of Eastern Utah's Cultural Resources on a Grand Scale
    Jody Patterson

    Balloons, kites, helicopters, and airplanes have been used to study archaeological sites and cultural landscapes since they first took to the air. Today’s technologies (airplanes, drones, small sensors, and GIS) and public citizen advocacy frameworks (citizen science and public-benefit flying) provide unprecedented opportunities take cultural resource preservation to a whole new height (pun intended). The combination of the citizen science movement, public-benefit flying, low-cost aerial technologies, and open source software can be combined to generate nearly real-time monitoring and data collection aimed at historic preservation in remote areas. This presentation will introduce these movements and technologies and discuss how to implement an aerial site stewardship program in eastern Utah based on their frameworks.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Cliff Dwellings Speak (book)June 2, 2016
    Cliff Dwellings Speak—Deciphering the Ancient Cliff Dwellings of the American Southwest
    Beth & Bill Sagstetter

    Have you ever scrambled up a steep cliff to a cliff dwelling only to be disappointed when you finally arrived? Did it seem inscrutable and mute? It did to us for many years. After 40 years of researching and exploring cliff dwellings we discovered some little-known techniques for unraveling the mysteries of these ancient ruins, and we would like to share them with you. New and updated information!

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Dead Horse Point State ParkJune 9, 2016
    Dead Horse Point State Park
    Crystal White

    More info coming soon! (photo by Charlie Choc)

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Colorado PikeminnowJuly 14, 2016
    Colorado Pikeminnow: Life History and Exciting Findings from the 2015 Field Season
    Christopher Michaud, Utah Division of Wildlife

    The Colorado Pikeminnow is the largest predatory fish native to the Colorado River Basin. Pikeminnow were once common but beginning in the 1930s, populations of this big river predatory fish began to decline. Originally listed as endangered by USFWS in 1967, Pikeminnow were given full protection under the Endangered Species Act in 1973. Today, the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program, a multi stakeholder partnership, is attempting to recover this imperiled species through an adaptive management strategy.  Chris will help us learn about the status this native fish.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    Photo by Laurie WebsterAncient Textiles, Baskets, Wood and Hides from Southeastern Utah
    September 29, 2016

    Laurie Webster

    During the 1890’s, local “cowboy” archaeologists excavated thousands of prehistoric perishable artifacts from alcoves in Southeastern Utah. Most were shipped to museums outside of the Southwest, where they were largely forgotten by archaeologists and the public. In this presentation, Laurie Webster will discuss her recent research with these collections and highlight some of the extraordinary 1000 to 2000 year-old textiles, baskets, hides, wooden implements, and other perishable artifacts from sites in this region.

  • Posted By Aaron Sonnenschein

    WPA Federal Art Project poster LAST MIC LECTURE OF 2016! Special Lecture on Tuesday!
    JANUARY 11, 2016

    Ranger Doug

    Between 1935 and 1943 the WPA's Federal Art Project printed over two million posters 35,000 different designs to stir the public's imagination for education, theater, health, safety, and travel. Due to their fragile nature only two thousand posters have survived to this day; less than one tenth of one percent! Ranger Doug's Enterprises is the only source for faithful reproductions of WPA National Park serigraphed posters.  Originally produced between 1938 and 1941, these sixteen (the fourteen printed in Berkeley CA plus two See America prints printed in 1935 in NYC) stunning historical national park posters have been painstakingly restored, one screen at a time and are now offered again as screened prints. Join Doug Leen, aka Ranger Doug, as he discusses the processes he uses to reproduce the WPA style prints and posters. 

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